New evidence that new beavers across the UK has been a success

New evidence that new beavers across the UK has been a success

The introduction of beavers in Britain has been hailed a success as fresh evidence emerges about the animals' ecological effects.

Scientists have studied the way the beavers are changing water courses and habitat in the Cairngorms area of the Scottish Highlands.

Using satellite-tracked cameras, they have been able to measure the amount of sediment deposited and upland areas affected by beavers in the area.

Despite attempts to try to stop beavers, they have been observed mating and leaving behind beaver dens

Scientists have used satellite-tracked cameras to determine the amount of sediment deposited and upland areas affected by beavers in the Cairngorms area

Extensive beaver activity is having an 'almost immediate' effect on water channels, water levels and sediment deposition in a 'significant' number of plots across the Highlands

Studies at seven sites over 24 months have found beavers are creating channels through wetland lands, while diminishing water levels in surface irrigation channels.

'Beaver activity is having an 'almost immediate' effect on water channels, water levels and sediment deposition in a 'significant' number of plots across the Highlands,' said Professor Ian Puleston-Davies, of the University of Dundee.

'Removing them quickly does not result in evidence of the effects of being gone, but there is a clear and significant body of evidence pointing to the beaver's impact.'

A joint study funded by the Scottish Environment Protection Agency and the Fife Environment Agency has also shown large areas of woodland in the Highlands have been transformed by the movements of beavers.

'Beaver activity has altered the landscape within this forest with habitat ranging from the broad to the narrow and highly complex,' said the report by Nottingham Trent University's Carl Waite and Dundee University's Alan Ash.

Despite attempts to try to stop beavers, they have been observed mating and leaving behind beaver dens.


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