When jellyfish turn up by the banks of a river, you know it’s big news

When jellyfish turn up by the banks of a river, you know it’s big news

A MYSTERIOUS jellyfish which appeared off the Far North Queensland coast is a world record breaker.

The 400lb, 15ft creature has been named the biggest stingray ever discovered.

The jellyfish was brought to Arthurs Point beach near Cooktown on the Atherton Tablelands after it washed up by the banks of a river.

The last record of a stingray weighing more than 400 pounds was recorded in November in the US state of Arkansas.

It was tagged with an ID tag so scientists could come back in the future and bring it to shore.

The fish was tagged with an ID tag so scientists could come back in the future and bring it to shore.

'We think it's a hornfish,' local conservation volunteer Greg Bakay said.

'It's great and it's part of history. We'll eventually get it back to the sea and have some photos.'

Hornfish are unique among the squid and octopus that populate Australia's shorelines.

They grow to about two metres long and produce hundreds of tiny tentacles that run from their eyes to the end of their tentacles.

There are about 200 species of hornfish in the world, some of which, like the one spotted by locals in Far North Queensland, are protected by species protection laws.

Other animals in the area such as turtles and sharks have raised fears that the fishing of these creatures is unsustainable.

The three metre whale shark was filmed by onlookers after it spotted off the Queensland coast.

Learn more at Palo Alto Review


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